Apologetics study bible pdf free

This article is about the systematic defense of a apologetics study bible pdf free position. For the Christian parody band, see ApologetiX. This article includes a list of references, but its sources remain unclear because it has insufficient inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations.


In 21st century usage, ‘apologetics’ is often identified with debates over religion and theology. The term “apologetics” derives from the Ancient Greek word apologia. This term appears in the Koine Greek of the New Testament. The Apostle Paul employs the term apologia in his trial speech to Festus and Agrippa when he says “I make my defense” in Acts 26:2.

A cognate form appears in Paul’s Letter to the Philippians as he is “defending the gospel” in Philippians 1:7, and in “giving an answer” in 1 Peter 3:15. Although the term ‘apologetics’ has Western, primarily Christian origins and is most frequently associated with the defense of Christianity, the term is sometimes used referring to the defense of any religion in formal debate involving religion. Many apologetic books have been written in defence of the history or teachings of the Bahá’í Faith.

The religion’s founders wrote several books presenting proofs of their religion, among them are the Báb’s Seven Proofs and Bahá’u’lláh’s Kitáb-i-Íqán. Later Bahá’í authors wrote prominent apologetic texts, such as Mírzá Abu’l-Fadl’s The Brilliant Proof and Udo Schaefer et al.

One of the earliest Buddhist apologetic texts is The Questions of King Milinda, which deals with the Buddhist metaphysics such as the `no-self’ nature of the individual and characteristics such as of wisdom, perception, volition, feeling, consciousness and the soul. In the mid-19th century, encounters between Buddhists and Christians in Japan prompted the formation of a Buddhist Propagation Society.

De Silva, an Australian convert to Buddhism, has written a book, Beyond Belief, providing Buddhist apologetic responses and a critique of Christian Fundamentalist doctrine. Gunapala Dharmasiri wrote an apologetic critique of the Christian concept of God from a Theravadan Buddhist perspective. The Scutum Fidei, a diagram frequently used by Christian apologists to explain the Trinity.

Christian apologetics combines Christian theology, natural theology, and philosophy to present a rational basis for the Christian faith, to defend the faith against objections and misrepresentation. Christian apologetics has taken many forms over the centuries. In the Roman Empire, Christians were severely persecuted, and many charges were brought against them.

David Cassel gives several examples: Tacitus wrote that Nero fabricated charges that Christians started the burning of Rome. Saul of Tarsus, Justin Martyr, Irenaeus and others often defended Christianity against charges that were brought to justify persecution. Later apologists have focused on providing reasons to accept various aspects of Christian belief. Christian apologists of many traditions, in common with Jews, Muslims, and some others, argue for the existence of a unique and personal God.

Theodicy is one important aspect of such arguments, and Alvin Plantinga’s arguments have been highly influential in this area. Many prominent Christian apologists are scholarly philosophers or theologians, frequently with additional doctoral work in physics, cosmology, comparative religions, or other fields. Others take a more popular or pastoral approach.